Saving Tips for College Students

SAVING TIPS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS

 

College is a time of education, exploration and adventure; it’s also a period where you likely need to save money. When you and most of your friends are trying to keep more funds in the bank, you can use some clever tips to help you get the most out of your money.

Review Your Meal Plan

If you’re constantly having money left over on your meal plan at the end of the semester, consider a more cost-effective plan. While the college might require you to have a certain meal plan during your first-year there, you will likely have more freedom as you earn more credits.

Shop For Textbooks Wisely

You’ve probably heard older students complaining about the cost of books if you’re new to campus. Skipping out on buying books is a bad idea because professors require them for a reason. Instead, ask your professor if it’s acceptable to use an older version or an online version of the book if one of those options is available for less. Also, you might be able to reduce the cost of books by taking them out from the library.

Move to Off-campus Housing  

In the beginning of your college career, you may want to see what life is like living on campus. After the first two years or so, however, you may want to consider moving off of the campus. Moving to off-campus housing doesn’t mean you have to commute from your parents’ home. Instead, you could opt to share a house or an apartment with friends, which will probably be cheaper than staying in the dorms.

Don’t Squander Opportunities  

Many colleges have plenty of free or low-cost programs, soirees and events for students to attend. Also, you might find that your school offers discounts at local attractions if you bring your student identification card along with you. Instead of rolling your eyes at the free opportunities on campus, consider how they can make a major difference in your spending. 

At this point in your life, you might not think that saving money matters too much, and you might spend all of the funds that you have. Eventually, this issue is going to cause financial problems in your life. Instead of making a mess for later, take steps to reduce your spending now.

4 Tips to Follow When Building Your Credit

4 Tips to Follow When Building Your Credit (1) (1)

Your credit history has massive impact on your personal finances, as well as your entire life.  Individuals with poor credit, or no established credit at all, face many challenges when it pertains to milestones in life like purchasing a new vehicle or your first home.  Once you have established credit, it may be difficult to manage. It is important to remember, credit options may not make you dish out money immediately, but they do need to be paid back; this is where the difficulty may come in.  Nevertheless, credit can always be built back up.  

Here are 4 tips for building your credit.

Make Sure Your Credit Reports are Accurate

With the evolution of the internet, there are many ways for someone to look up their credit reports; some resources will provide one score, while others will go more in depth with a full credit report. There are three major credit bureaus that your credit report and score is based off of, Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion. It is important to make sure that when you are accessing these scores, they are accurate.  If you see something on your report that isn’t supposed to be there, or it is not accurate and negatively affecting your score, you can attempt to dispute it.

Confirm Areas That Need to be Improved

Once you analyze your reports from all three major credit bureaus, confirm what areas need to be improved.  Whether it is a credit card with a long term balance, or a loan that you’ve missed payments on. Make note of those areas, and tackle them strategically over a period of time.  It is always important to remember that the improvement of credit can happen, but does often take some time and patience.

Make Any Late Payments

If you notice late payments on your credit report, immediately take steps to bring them up-to-date.  Late payments can affect your interest rates, and build up penalty late fees that will push back any payment progress that you’ve been making.  Always keep in mind, if you can pay off an entire credit card balance, it is better to do so as soon as you can.

Make Payments In Full & On Time

In future credit purchases and transactions, make sure to make your payments on time, and if you are able, in full.  If you are unable to pay a transaction off in full, put the maximum amount you can afford toward your monthly payment; the quicker the balance comes down, the better.  To help make your payments on time, considering setting up auto-pay. Auto-pay is a great tool to ensure you don’t accumulate late fees due to a missing payment.

Personal Finance Tips for New Parents

John J Bowman Jr Accountant - Personal Finance

Raising a child is absurdly expensive. According to the latest federally-provided figures, a child can cost his or her parents an average of $233,610 over the course of eighteen years – and that isn’t even accounting for private or college tuition! Welcoming a child into the world is an exciting time for any parent, but it requires some practical thinking and hard financial conversations. Here, I overview a few strategies that every single expecting or current parent should implement to secure their own and their child’s financial future.

 

Create a New Budget

A new baby brings new expenses. The added financial cost posed by diapers, formula, and childcare can weigh down even a solidly made budget. Keep track of your expenses, and build a budget around the actual expenses you face, rather than those you projected pre-baby. Mind you, some of the costs you encounter might not be ones you anticipated; make sure that your health insurance will provide adequate coverage for your child in the case of emergencies. The last thing you want to discover on a trip to a needed doctor’s appointment is that your insurance doesn’t extend to your baby.

 

Bolster Your Emergency Fund

While every adult should have a sturdy emergency fund, these tucked-away savings are vital for new parents. After all, losing your job when the only person you have to worry about is yourself is one problem. Losing your job when you need to support a child is a problem of an entirely different magnitude. Make sure that you have enough in your emergency account to cover your family’s living expenses for three to six months in case of disaster, and ensure your financial security by reducing your credit card debt.  

 

Set Up a College Savings Account Now

It may seem odd to start saving for college when your child is still in preschool, but starting early is the only way to lessen the burden of tuition. Set up a 529 college savings account, and contribute however much you can afford every month. Your small inputs will add up over eighteen years; while it may not be able to cover the full cost of college, it should defray the overall burden and put your child in a position to graduate with a manageable amount of college loan debt.

 

Research Applicable Tax Credits

Knowledge is the key to financial security. Common tax credits include the child tax credit, which can give you a $1000 credit every year until your child turns seventeen, and the child and dependent-care credit, which provides qualifying filers the chance to claim up to $3000 for a single child under the age of 13. Do some research to find out which tax credits your child gives you eligibility for!